books

Deep breath.

Hello world!

I know it has been over six months since I’ve updated, and it’s terrible. Every so often I would open up my blog and stare determinedly at the “new post” button, but I never managed to muster up the willpower to write an entry. I think the problem was that there was just so much going on in my life, that the task of condensing it into bite-sized paragraphs seemed insurmountable. For most of the past half-year, I’ve been playing catch-up, week to week, with all the things I’m supposed to be and do. I think now, at least, I’m glad to say I’ve reached a point where I’m able to take a deep breath and refocus.

In February of this grand year, I started my training in psychiatry. Working in an inpatient psychiatric ward at a busy public hospital has been hectic and challenging, at many points. But it has also been immensely eye-opening, memorable and rewarding. But more reflections on psychiatry training to come later.

I also did not finish my book. I hate admitting failure: it gives me a cold shudder in the pit of my gut. But it’s true—sadly, I didn’t achieve what I set out to do in my six months off from work. I wrote up to chapter 23 of a planned 30, and then—bam!—life got in the way. And then I lost faith in the story, and I haven’t yet picked it up again. I haven’t written anything for a few months, struggling to find inspiration amidst the busy-ness of fulltime work and study.

A Time article reminded me recently:

Failing is OK. Not failing is not OK. If you don’t flop every so often, you’re not trying hard enough.

I’ll keep trying.

In the vein of cheesy, motivational quotes, I’ve embarked on a bit of a personal mission to be less cynical and more positive. About two months ago, rather uncharacteristically, I browsed “inspirational quotes” on Pinterest and felt immensely uplifted by the words. I’ve even become one of those people with an inspirational quote on my phone wallpaper. I know, I can’t believe it. But being more positive to people around me on a day to day basis has had such a tangible effect. As soon as I shifted my mindset and behaviour, I noticed changes. My day became less stressful. People responded to me more warmly. I was able to be a soothing presence when others were stressed, and to give more to help out. When a coworker was short to me and others, I understood that she was probably stressed out and used to being spoken to in a grumpy manner. So instead of shutting her out, I decided to do her a favour. I think I’ve just realised the magic of returning coldness with warmth.

Anyway, onto some book recommendations!

Non-Fiction

Stuff Matters – Mark Miodownik 

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This is an informative, interesting and fun read. Miodownik is a materials scientist with a flair for words. There are ten chapters in this book; each chapter discusses a different material in our daily lives—glass, charcoal, steel, concrete, etc—from a historical and scientific perspective. It’s pretty eye-opening and you really learn to marvel at the extra-ordinariness of the ordinary substances around us. Highly recommended.

China in Ten Words – Yu Hua

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Ever since reading the graphic novel A Chinese Life and visiting China at the end of 2013 (and oh yeah, maybe because I’m ethnically Chinese too…ha ha), I’ve been somewhat interested in 20th century Chinese history and the shaping of modern Chinese culture. That’s why I was quick to snap up this book by Yu Hua when I found it in Green Apple Books in San Francisco. It’s a collection of ten essays, each one reflecting on an aspect of Chinese culture from a personal and analytical perspective. For someone living outside China, it’s fascinating. Another highly recommended read.

Fiction

Avatar: The Last Airbender – The Promise & The Search – Gene Luen Yang

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These spin-off comics are set after the events of the original series. The Promise and the Search are each an instalment of three, and there’s a third trilogy, The Rift, as well. I had my doubts, but Gene Luen Yang’s artwork is wonderfully lively and the story stays true to the spirit of the series. These comics are very fun reads, and The Search is especially compelling. Worth reading if you’re a fan of the series!

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More next time,

Grace

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The Queen’s Thief series – Megan Whalen Turner

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Time for a speedy book review!

In my opinion, this is one of the best YA fantasy series out there. I hunted down the first book in the series, The Thief, as soon as I heard the premise.

The most powerful advisor to the King of Sounis is the magus. He’s not a wizard, he’s a scholar, an aging soldier, not a thief. When he needs something stolen, he pulls a young thief from the King’s prison to do the job for him.

Gen is a thief and proud of it. When his bragging lands him behind bars he has one chance to win his freedom– journey to a neighboring kingdom with the magus, find a legendary stone called Hamiathes’s Gift and steal it.

The magus has plans for his King and his country. Gen has plans of his own.

The things that set these novels apart, for me, are:

  • The pseudo-Byzantine atmosphere of Gen’s world, and the Greek-inspired mythology. The names are evocative of a classic period: Sounis, Sophos, Ambiades, Attolia, Hamaithes, Hephestia.
  • Turner’s restrained and elegant style of writing. She uses point of view and omission very craftily, and constantly keeps the reader guessing as to characters’ true motives. I felt that she was conveying so much through the spaces, the silences, and the words that weren’t said. I enjoyed her writing a lot.
  • The characters. They say the characters make a story work, so if you’re looking for a tale with thought-out characters that will fascinate you and make you believe they really existed, in some other world, in some other time…then look no further.
  • The beautiful cover art. So pretty.

Turner writes patiently and with attention to detail. Some have complained that the first book takes a long time to get going, and if you prefer faster-paced books, you may struggle through the first half of The Thief. But I encourage you to persevere, because it’s worth it. The second  book, The Queen of Attolia, is probably the most popular book and has somewhat faster pacing.

The Queen’s Thief series creates a unique world that you can really get lost in. These books had me hopping in bed early every night, excited to find out what would happen next. The plot is both subtle and thrilling, with adventures through the wilderness, fights and capers, political intrigue, wit, inventive myths and even a bit of romance. What more could you ask for?

Ramble.

I am a doctor. Yes, I am.

A doctor with provisional registration, at the very least, who must still run most of her decisions past a superior, and whose main areas of expertise are, summarily: inserting drips, writing discharge letters, and looking for folders. If, by the time the end of this year rolls around, we haven’t accidentally prescribed someone 100 units of insulin, or ignored a head injury after a fall, we are rewarded with a full registration. (Which, of course, we need to fork out several hundred dollars for.)

The way things work in Australia is that junior doctors must re-apply to hospitals every year; we are employed as “temporary full time” workers, on a contract that only lasts for 12 months. It’s a bit sucky. You spend a couple of months celebrating the fact that you survived interviews and got a job, only to realise that you have to do the whole thing over again. And again.

I recently submitted an application to do a six-month job next year, hopefully as a psychiatry resident. I’m planning to take six months off to do something totally silly and wonderful: write. I’m really excited. And a bit scared. (A little of becoming poor, but more of failure.)

This is how the rest of my year is looking:

– a couple more interviews, maybe

– hepatobiliary surgical rotation

– emergency department rotation

– trip to China and Hong Kong, yayz!

– three weeks break in January 2014

– work, if I have a job

:)

I think I’m feeling optimistic.

My day is looking not too shoddy either. I’ve got work 4-10pm, which is manageable, but I’ll be grumpy because I’ve got a cold. In the meantime, I have plenty to occupy myself with. For the past year I have been struggling to finish the Bitterbynde Trilogy by Cecilia Dart-Thornton–an Australian fantasy author, with wonderful writing ability, but LORDY. There came a point in the third book where I felt like I was just being constantly slapped in the face by purple prose. Her turns of phrase are lovely, but really, does she need to spend three lines describing how beautiful the inside of a strawberry is? We all know what a strawberry looks like.

Paragraph about strawberry.

Paragraph about strawberry.

Normally I have a rule that I give up on a book if it’s really struggling to hold my attention, but the Bitterbynde Trilogy admittedly is very beautiful. It’s sweeping and bursting with Celtic mythology and it’s got Faeran folk in it. It’s well planned out and elegant. I’ve just had enough of fantasy tropes, Mary Sue characters and dizzying descriptions of heartbreakingly handsome Faeran heroes. I’m sure the trilogy could have been one book shorter. Anyway, I’ve only got about 80 pages to go so I may as well skim through it.

Ten dolla! I picked up this trilogy from an amazing little bookstore in Morwell, Victoria called "The Nook and Cranny". If you're ever in Gippsland and you're a book nerd, you have to step inside this place. It's so unpretentiously rad.

Ten dolla! I picked up this trilogy from an amazing little bookstore in Morwell, Victoria called “The Nook and Cranny”. If you’re ever in Gippsland and you’re a book nerd, you have to step inside this place. It’s so unpretentiously rad.

I recently also read The Mind of a Mnemonist, by the Russian neuropsychologist Alexander Luria, who lived and worked in the early-mid 1900s. I heard about Luria whilst listening to a podcast featuring Oliver Sacks (Sacks cites Luria as one of his key inspirations). Mnemonist is a detailed case study about a dude who can remember everything. He also has intense five-sense synaesthesia, which is bizarre and fascinating to explore. Luria really delves into the guy’s mind, how his thought processes work, how his gift affects his personality, and what his weaknesses are.

In the TV world, I’ve just finished the season 2 finale of Battlestar Galactica–several years too late, I know–which, as usual, keeps blowing my mind. I can’t believe I didn’t listen sooner to my friends (looking at you, Mookxi!) who told me to watch this. Spaceships plus Greek mythology plus intense character study. HOW COULD ANYTHING BE MORE AWESOME?

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Speaking of ancient Greek myth, I highly recommend the Greek and Roman Mythology course over at Coursera.org for anyone looking for an intro into ancient mythology. The readings can be a bit intensive on top of full time work or study but I found it totally worthwhile. It’s a very well taught course and a great starting point for beginners like me!

Oh no, work looms in four hours. Time to work on my novel. Wish me luck! Have an excellent week, readers. Don’t forget to smile unexpectedly and creepily at someone to brighten up their day.

x

Grace

PS. Can’t help it, but toaster Cylons just remind me of Cybermen. I think they used the same sound effects :P

cylon cybermen

Doctoring and Homer-the-poet (and general excitement about life)

Just got home and cleaned up after the easiest medical cover shift in the history of cover shifts!

I felt like I was getting away with murder. I spent the first half hour chowing down my chicken schnitzel wrap, the next two hours browsing Reddit and snoozing on the most comfortable couch in the world (which, FYI, is located in the residents’ lounge of the hospital at which I work).

Said comfy couch is ugly, brown, obese and probably very grotty from the 278 different junior doctors who have kicked back in its cushiony depths. And yet it is so soft. It’s like sleeping on a gentle, giant, fluffy turd. Can you imagine anything more wonderful?

After 5pm my pager finally started going off and I trudged upstairs to the wards to review medications, rewrite drug charts, check fluid statuses and pop in drips like a pro. I was smiling at all the nurses and spreading cheer and goodwill like Santa Claus. One thing I’ve learnt from cover shifts is not to be grumpy. It just makes for more of a pleasant shift if you make an effort to be pleasant first.

Fast forward six hours and I’m home, rinsed of the hospital grime, dressed in rather comical polka dot mint-green pyjamas and wrapped like a sausage roll in a blanket. I’m way too excited about the three work-free days I’ve got ahead of me.

I can’t wait to hop into bed and read Book 24 of the Odyssey. I thought that when I started this Greek and Roman Mythology course on Coursera, reading a Homeric epic would be a long haul. And for a few chapters here and there, it was tough. BUT O-M-G. The Odyssey is SO EPIC. EPIC TO THE MAX! I love it. I do not want to read Book 24 because it will end. But at the same time I can’t wait to read it. Argh. Excitement.

In preparation for this course I ordered a few books online and now I’ve got a small pile of classics sitting on my desk, looking really hardcore and classicsy. They’re seriously intimidating me with their academic glory. I hope I manage to get through the set readings over the next seven or so weeks. The course pushes a tough pace and it takes effort to get the week’s homework done around my real job, social riff-raff and all those TV shows I’ve just got to watch…

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Speaking of necessary TV shows, THE OFFICE (US) IS ENDING. It is acutely tragic. I have lived with this show ever since the BF introduced it to me circa three years ago. I have sobbed for Pam and Jim. I have bust a rib cacking myself at Dwight’s antics. I have bowed to Creed being possibly the awesomest supporting character ever. The finale airs May 16th and marks the end of an era; the end of a show that helped to bring cringe comedy into the mainstream. I have no doubt I will cry.

Tomorrow night, worked around our irregular schedules, is a long-awaited date night. Planned events? Butter chicken and biryani rice, Star Trek: Into Darkness, Game of Throooooones, Office. May or may not be able to fit in all events, but I will update on the highlights.

Last week, half a month after everyone else, we watched Iron Man 3. Blockbustery pow-pow and unbelievably streamlined technology and a whole army of iron men and Pepper Potts going all uber. It was a super fun movie to watch, but had an unsatisfying ending. Best bit was Ben Kingsley. Oh, and that cute kid that helped Tony Stark out.

Sign that I’m getting tired. Amputated sentences and inventing fake adjectives by adding -y to the ends of nouns. I’m off to bed with Homer.

More next time,

Grace Le Fay.

A Mish-Mash of Highlights: Doctor Who, Cloud Atlas, Eddings, etc.

Beanie of the year.

Beanie of the year.

It’s getting towards winter down here in the southern hemisphere of the world.

Last week the weather took a welcome dip from the thirties into the low twenties, and we all started layering extra blankets onto our beds and pulling out scarves, beanies, brollies and boots. For me, this time of year is marked by the transition from pyjama shorts to pyjama pants, and the resumption of a continuous intake of hot tea. It’s quite blissful.

Important events of this week included:

1. Neil Gaiman’s wonderfully well-timed and encouraging post on, amongst other things, writing: http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2013/03/princess-and-some-thoughts-on-writing.html

doctor who the bells of saint john

2. The return of Doctor Who; more specifically Doctor Who Season 7 Episode 6: “The Bells of St. John.”

Five-line review…

A modern-London adventure, penned by Moffat, with lively new companion Clara ‘Oswin’ Oswald, that also oddly comes across as a warning against being too connected to wifi/social media, just in case malicious aliens want to eat your mind through the interwebs. Chemistry between Smith and Coleman felt less forced. Plot was well-paced and easy to follow with neat twists. Great half-season kick-off that continues the mystery of the girl with multiple lives.

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3. Season 3 of Game of Thrones. You know it’s getting big when you see a GoT ad at the local bus stop. To be watched.

4. Finishing David Eddings The Elenium Book 2 (The Ruby Knight). Recommended by the beloved BF, who read it in the early days of his youth, the Elenium is a grand swords-and-sorcery style fantasy epic largely revolving around politics. There is a severe deficiency of cool female characters in this story, as Sparhawk and the other heroes are mostly big buff knights with even bigger swords/axes who deliver awesome one-liners before and after they behead their foes. The only key females are Sephrenia, an ageless sorceress, and Flute, a mysterious little girl with powers–interesting, but not entirely unique. Most of the book involves riding back and forth across the countries of Eosia chasing the Bhelliom (a precious gem). Eddings’ writing is unpretentious, lively and straightforward. An easy series to read, though long, and it keeps you turning the pages.

5. Watching Cloud Atlas.

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Cloud Atlas is an insane compendium of story fragments–6 different narratives, each taking place at a different point in time–piled on top of one another. Some of the narratives are fascinating (I liked the futuristic Neo-Seoul story best) and others are boring (Tom Hanks and Halle Berry in the post-apocalyptic distant future. It was impossible to engage with their characters given almost no context and zero background about their motivations and situation). Jim Broadbent’s imprisonment and dramatic escape from an English nursing home is also a gem, as is Jim Wishaw’s portrayal of composer/musician Robert Frobisher.

I was hoping that there would be more of a sense of interconnection between the 6 timezones, but apart from using the same actors and a few pieces of prose floating from period to period (journals, documents), it lacked for substance. The narratives were largely entertaining, but at the end of the Wachowski’s masterpiece I wasn’t sure what message I was supposed to get from it all.

The structure of the book, however, sounds intriguing: a sort of concertina of stories, travelling from 1849AD, through to 2321AD, and back again. Elegant. Perhaps I’ll get my grubby hands on it one day.

Off to work.

x,

GLF

2012-2013: Summer Reading List: Part Three – Wells, Gaiman, Stroud

1. The Time Machine – H.G. Wells

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Why not kick off Part 3 with a classic?

Years ago, I read an abridged version of the Time Machine without realising it was an abridged version until I finished it and thought, that was really short. (Hey, I’m clever.)

To be honest, the complete text didn’t add a whole lot more. It’s a short book; my copy was just over a hundred pages. Wells’s story is an elegantly penned tale about a mysterious scientist, referred to only as ‘the Time Traveller’, who regales his disbelieving peers with a story of his voyage into the far distant future.

The Time Machine has a decidedly steampunk feel, particularly with all the levers and clockwork machinery (the machine itself is ‘squat, ugly, and askew, a thing of brass, ebony, ivory and translucent glimmering quartz’), and that I enjoyed. The scope of Wells’s narrative is also impressive–his protagonist travels 500,000 years into the future to discover that mankind has devolved into two very different species, the Eloi and the Morlocks. He then goes further still, to witness the fate of the dying Earth. Wells’ ideas are so far-fetched that I struggled to find them even remotely believable, though I supposed believability isn’t at all the point of the story.

Wells’s writing puts me somewhat in mind of C.S. Lewis in this instant: eloquent, not overly fanciful, as easy to follow as a bobbing tide. I liked the choice of using a nameless point of view character, listening to the Time Traveller’s story. The ending is also a treat.

2. The Graveyard Book – Neil Gaiman

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A very enjoyable Gaiman read. I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to get around to TGB. I can’t say much more about this book that hasn’t already been said. It’s written for children and that definitely shows, but that’s not to say there isn’t plenty for us full-grown kids to sink our teeth into.

Nobody Owens is an immensely likeable protagonist, and Silas, the witch-girl Liz, Bod’s adoptive parents and Miss Lupescu are all equally fun to encounter. Divided into eight parts that function as short stories to create a chronological novel, The Graveyard Book is well-paced and is a balanced mixture of adventure and poignancy. Favourite parts include Bod’s escape from the greedy pawn-shop owner with Liz’s help, and Scarlett and Bod’s exploration of the Sleer’s cave.

Gaiman’s play on names is quite delightful and his prose is as lively as ever. A surprisingly fun read, despite the fact that the opening scenes involve the attempted murder of a baby o_O

3. The Ring of Solomon – Jonathan Stroud

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As I am a huge fan of the Bartimaeus trilogy, I knew it would only be a matter of time before I got around to reading the sequel–or rather, the prequel.

In Ring of Solomon, we are transported into a pseudo-Biblical period Jerusalem overrun by magicians and spirits. A slightly younger Bartimaeus is a slave of one of King Solomon’s many magicians. Solomon himself rules Israel and surrounding submissive kingdoms with the help of an Uberly Powerful Ring that can raise armies of demons at a single touch.

Bartimaeus’s wit is by no means diminished, and his POV chapters are a romp. Asmira, the female protagonist and a super loyal member of the Queen of Sheba’s guard, on a suicidal mission to kill Solomon, provides the more boring half of the book. For most of the story she isn’t much more than a one-dimensional, annoying character with zero sense of humour. I was somewhat disappointed.

The reappearance of Farquarl and the rapport between Farquarl and Bartimaeus are a hoot, and the character of Solomon is unexpectedly intriguing. I thought this book would be uniformly predictable but I was proven wrong. Though Ring of Solomon doesn’t have the scope of the original trilogy, Stroud has not lost his ability to tell an awesome tale (moreover, he actually does action scenes well, which is a rare talent in my opinion). If we’re in luck there’ll be lots more Barty adventures to come.

PS. Can someone please make this into a movie, stat?!?

As summer’s coming to an end in my corner of the world, that brings my reading list to a close. Hope you enjoyed the science fiction flavour this year and maybe discovered something that you’d like to read or re-read. Do stay tuned for many more reads throughout 2013 :)

2012-2013 Summer Reading List: Part Two – Dick, Moorcock, Howey

Part Two of my Summer Reading List has unintentionally given me a title that in turn gives me the giggles. Immaturity aside, on to the reviews!

1. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? – Philip K. Dick

do androids dream

This is a funny little book with a funny long title. I think I fell in love with the title, first, which bumped it up on my to-read list. And I love how as you read the book the title begins to make the most perfect, lucid sense.

Dick’s vision of a post-apocalyptic future is stifling in its desolation. Earth has been ravaged by some sort of nuclear war, the detritus of which will gradually turn any terran-bound human into an imbecile. To escape the fallout, all but a few humans have fled to other planets. It’s an interesting backdrop to explore the social, moral and economic implications of android technology in human society.

If you’ve seen Blade Runner, you know the story. Rick Deckard, a middle-aged bounty hunter, is tasked with destroying six runaway Nexus-6 (ie, top of the range) androids. As he hunts down and kills the androids, who are remarkably human in almost every aspect, Deckard has to come to terms with what qualities separate humans from androids and ends up questioning his own humanity (and lack of empathy…).

It’s a short book; the plot is far from complex. What really struck me about DADOES were the elements of Dick’s bleak world. The mood organ, the consumerist social stratification based around owning increasingly rare animals, the creepy empathy box and the religion of Mercerism, the shallowness of Buster Friendly’s TV show (which put me in mind of the message of Fahrenheit 451) — these were never fully explained, preached about or used more than as an unsettling backdrop for the action. Which made their inclusion more profound and thought-provoking.

I think everyone will get a different message from this book. There are probably a hundred thoughts I could expand upon, but I won’t ramble. The main thing I learnt is that, on paper, androids are ridiculously easy to kill. At least Harrison Ford got beat up a bit before he succeeded.

2. Blood: A Southern Fantasy – Michael Moorcock

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moorcock

Not only have I heard Michael Moorcock’s name raised on the winds of many science-fiction/fantasy circles with great respect, his Wikipedia page is fascinating and Neil Gaiman cites him as an early influence. So I knew I had to get around to reading his stuff. I bought a whole stack of his books at a criminal price off a second-hand book store online. Unfortunately they didn’t have any Elric of Melnibone, so I picked Blood at random and plunged right in.

Blood is the first in a trilogy. I’ll try to describe the plot. It’s a delirious romantic-adventure set in an alternate southern America where the world is being torn apart by the appearance of “colour spots” — portals, or leaks, of pure wild paranormal energy. It follows four main characters with gloriously luscious names (Jack Karaquazian, Colinda Dovero, Sam Oakenhurst and the Rose — who is actually half human, half flora) who are jugaderos, or gamblers, by profession and by soul. They gamble their livelihoods on a strange supernatural game that involves creating and destroying worlds in other dimensions. Interspersed in all this are chapters set in the Second Ether, an alternate level of reality where a war is being waged in its formless seas between the Chaos Engineers and the Singularity.

When I said ‘delirious,’ I wasn’t kidding.

The calibre of Moorcock’s prose blows my hat off (well, it would, if I wore a hat). He’s really good. Somehow, despite being utterly befuddled, he kept me reading and reading. I was lost but I didn’t feel lost. This book is packed with fantastical ideas of a frightening complexity (multiple dimensions, inhabiting another persona) and yet somehow he manages it without totally losing the reader.

I felt like this book was a bit of a colour spot in itself — pure, unbridled exploration of the fantasy genre, pushing the boundaries of storytelling and of the reader. I’m not sure whether I enjoyed this book, and I don’t think it was the best introduction to Moorcock. I’ll see if I can hunt down an Elric. Perhaps that will offer something a tad more traditional. I’m still not sure exactly what I read in Blood.

3. Wool Omnibus (Books 1-5) – Hugh Howey

wool cover

Hugh Howey. Hugh, Hugh, Hugh. The success story. The one who hit it big. Just like that. All of us aspiring writers are insanely jealous of you, and rightly so.

In 2011, Howey self-published a short story called “Wool” through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing System. I think he priced it at a few dollars. It got so popular that readers demanded more. From there he wrote Wool Books 1-7, all set in the same post-apocalyptic universe, and is working on 8 and 9. He recently signed a very lucrative book deal with Simon & Schuster while maintaining his rights to his work. Oh, and did I mention that Twentieth Century Fox has bought the film rights?

Wool Omnibus is a collected publication of Books 1-5 in the series. Book 1 is the original short story; 2-5 are much longer and form the continuous substance of the novel, with a couple of character POV shifts.

It’s easy to see what made Wool such a hit. It’s the characters. Lovable/relatable qualities + difficult circumstances = readers rooting for them with all their hearts. I like his decision to spend a whole segment on the tentatively blossoming romance between two sixty-something-year-olds. I like his feisty female mechanic-sheriff, Juliette. Who wouldn’t?

Howey’s writing style isn’t amazing but it’s unpretentious and because of that it works. The setting is well-researched and he has surprising twists in all the right places. The mystery of the subterranean silos — excellent. The poorly thought-out battle between the down-deeps and IT? Terrible — why and how did they think that violence would solve things? That bit was rushed and didn’t convince me at all.

Nevertheless, overall, a worthy work of science-fiction that focuses as heavily on characters as it does on plot. Jealous as I am, I recommend it. The only other thing I can gripe about is that the names are all so bland. Is everyone white and English? Surely in the future you’d see some multiculturalism in the silo? Or did all the countries segregate in the wake of the war? EXPLANATION PLEASE. It reminds me of the stories I wrote in primary school when my characters were Smith and Jones and Black. Even though I am Asian.

Wool

Stay Tuned for Part III: The Time Machine, The Graveyard Book, The Ring of Solomon, Puberty Blues…